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Famous Troys

In this Saturday’s football game, the Badgers take on the Trojans from Troy University. If you’re not familiar with the opponent, you’re in good company: virtually no one is familiar with Troy.

John Allen
September 14, 2015

In this Saturday’s football game, the Badgers take on the Trojans from Troy University. If you’re not familiar with the opponent, you’re in good company: virtually no one is familiar with Troy.

Troy was once known as Troy State (though Troy is, in fact, not a state—not one of America’s top 50, anyway), and before that as Troy Normal. It’s located in Troy, Alabama. In August, Forbes Magazine ranked Troy as the 648th-best university in America. UW-Madison ranked number 69, meaning that both are listed among the nation’s top 650.

What else do Wisconsin and Troy have in common? As it turns out, the UW has several famous Troy associations.

These are our top seven

Vincent:

A former cornerback for the Badgers (and then the Miami Dolphins, Philadelphia Eagles, Buffalo Bills, and Washington Redskins), Troy Vincent x’92 is now the NFL’s executive vice president for football operations.

Ancient:

UW archeology professor William Aylward has taken part in excavations at Hisarlik, Turkey, the site of ancient Troy.

Runge:

An assistant professor of biological systems engineering, Troy Runge directed the Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative from 2009–11.

Vosseller:

The co-founder of gener8tor, Troy Vosseller ’06, MBA’09, JD’10 may be best-known to UW students for Sconnie Nation, his State Street business.

Hornberger Lab:

Operated by comparative biosciences professor Troy Hornberger, the Troy Hornberger Lab in the School of Veterinary Medicine Laboratory studies skeletal muscle molecular physiology. It claims muppets Beaker and Bunsen as technical advisers.

East:

Birthplace of Maxine Hough ’63, a former member of the Wisconsin Assembly, East Troy, Wisconsin, has the largest population of the several Wisconsin communities with Troy in their name: 4,281 people.

Reeves:

Head of the UW’s Oral History Project, Troy Reeves has been recording memories of UW faculty, staff, and alumni for years.

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