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Charles K. Eckels, Jr., Animal Science Class of ’54, dies at age 84

May. 01, 2017
Category: Obituary

Charles Kenyon Eckels, Jr. (Chuck) of Jacksonville, OR, passed away on December 27, 2016. He was born on March 4, 1932, in Spokane, WA, to Charles K. Eckels, Sr. and Kathleen (Kelley) Eckels. Chuck grew up Wauwatosa, WI, and graduated from Wauwatosa High School in 1950.

He graduated with honors from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a Bachelor of Science degree in Agriculture (Animal Science) in June 1954. While in college, Chuck was in Phi Kappa Phi and Alpha Zeta honor societies and was a member of Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity. In the fall of 1952, during his junior year, he was on the UW meat judging team. They went to several meat judging contests that were held at livestock shows around the country. His team won one in Baltimore in November of that year. Then in December they were entered in one held at the International Live Stock Exposition in Chicago, and the three man team not only won the contest (out of twenty college teams entered), but for the first time in the history of the competition, the three team members were awarded the top three places in individual ratings.

Chuck married Jeanne (Hamm) Eckels in January 1954. Chuck served in the U.S. Army from 1955-1957, stationed at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, TX. Following his service, Chuck began a long career with Wilson Foods Corp., working in MN, IL, IA and OK. He later worked in both food and financial industry positions. In 1985, he moved to the Medford, OR, area where he enjoyed many outdoor activities and a gorgeous view from his home near the Siskiyou National Forest.

Chuck is survived by his children and grandchildren: Judi, Mark, Kevin and Chris Stillwell; Linda, Brent, Trevor and Catherine Gee; Steve, Glennis, Riley (Alison), Tucker and Tatum Eckels; and Elizabeth and Mary Elizabeth Eckels. He is predeceased by his parents, former wife, and son, Daniel Eckels.

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